Boomers “bust out of their demographic.” What if age isn’t the main driver of behavior any more? – EverythingZoomer

Are we entering the “post-demographic age”? Maybe so, according to London-based trendwatching.com: “People – of all ages and in all markets — are constructing their own identifies more freely than ever…time to throw out the traditional (and tired) demographic models of consumer behavior.”

Their observations – and the supporting evidence – are laid out in this fascinating article on EverythingZoomer.com.  Bottom line: Boomers in particular are not behaving the way their age would dictate, at least according to the traditional models.

The same is true of younger generations, as we’ve seen and commented on frequently on this blog. The Millennials are not, as a group, acting the way young- to mid-twentyish people acted in the past: they’re significantly “delayed” in their rates of marriage and family formation, and entry (beyond barista) into the job market. We’ve also noted, many times, that the “older” generations are acting younger than people of that same age in years past. So the idea isn’t totally new.

What’s I found intriguing in this report, though, is the degree of cross-generational activity and commonality: according to the head of music at the BBC, if you look at the 1,000 favorite artists of 60-year-olds and the 1,000 favorite artists of 13-year-olds, there is a 40 percent overlap.

Of course, age is still going to be a very strong driver of interests and behavior, particularly when it comes to money and health. But the assumptions of the past — that certain things kick in automatically (or stop happening automatically) at certain ages — are disappearing. Read the entire article for a sneak preview of a future in which the same people will act “older” and “middle aged” and “younger” at the same time.

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davidcravit

. Vice President, Zoomer Media Ltd. . Author of "The New Old" . 30 years experience in marketing communications, advertising, media . Speaker, writer, commentator on the revolution in aging and how to market to Boomers and seniors